Metal buckles

Not to be confused with buckling. Ancient bronze buckles from southern Sweden. The upper-left one is a simple frame-and-prong design, while the bottom buckle features an integrated chape or cap-end with a center pin attaching the metal buckles. The buckle or clasp is a device used for fastening two loose ends, with one end attached to it and the other held by a catch in a secure but adjustable manner. Often taken for granted, the invention of the buckle was indispensable in securing two ends before the invention of the zipper. The word «buckle» enters Middle English via Old French and the Latin buccula or «cheek-strap,» as for a helmet. Bronze Roman buckles came in various types. Not only used for practical purposes, these buckles were also decorated.

Aside from the practical use found in Roman buckles, Scythian and Sarmatian buckles incorporated animal motifs that were characteristic to their respective decorative arts. These motifs often represented animals engaged in mortal combat. These motifs were imported by many Germanic peoples and the belt buckles were evident in the graves of the Franks and Burgundies. Buckles remained exclusively for the wealthy until the 15th century where improved manufacturing techniques made it possible to easily produce a cheaper molded item available to the general population. The buckle essentially consists of four main components: the frame, chape, bar, and prong.

The oldest Roman buckles are of a simple «D»-shaped frame, in which the prong or tongue extends from one side to the other. In the 14th century, buckles with a double-loop or «8»-shaped frame emerged. The prongs of these buckles attach to the center post. The appearance of multi-part buckles with chapes and removable pins, which were commonly found on shoes, occurred in the 17th century. The frame is the most visible part of the buckle and holds the other parts of the buckle together. Buckle frames come in various shapes, sizes, and decorations. The shape of the frame could be a plain square or rectangle, but may be oval or made into a circular shape. A reverse curve of the frame indicated that the whole buckle was intended to be used for securing a thick material, such as leather.

Chapes or «caps» of various designs could be fitted to the bar to enable one strap end to be secured before fastening the other, adjustable end. This made buckles easily removable and interchangeable, leading to a significant advantage since buckles were expensive. The belt buckle chapes are frequently made in a form of a plate, thus the name buckle plate. In conventional belts, the prong fits through the buckle to secure the material at a pre-set length. The prong is usually referred to as the tongue of the buckle in America, as in ‘lock-tongued buckle’. Prong is only used when the tongue is permanently fixed in position.

The bar served to hold the chape and prong to the frame. When prongs and chapes are removed from the buckle design, the buckle incorporated a movable bar relying on the tension of the adjusted belt to keep it in place. The first known buckles to be used were made out of bronze for their strength and durability for military usage. In the 18th century, brass buckles incorporated iron bars, chapes, and prongs due to the parts being made by different manufactures. Silver was also used in buckle manufacturing for its malleability and for being strong and durable with an attractive shine. Pearl buckles have been made from pearly shells and usually for ladies’ dresses. Since a reasonable size flat surface was needed to make a buckle, oyster was commonly used to make these types of buckles. The quality and color of course vary, ranging from layers of yellow and white to brown or grey.

When preferred materials were scarce during the Great Depression of the 1930s and the two World Wars, buckles became a low priority and manufactures needed to find ways to continue to produce them cheaply. Makers turned to wood as a cheap alternative since it was easily worked by hand or simple machinery by impressing the designs onto the wood. But there were problems using wood. Buckles were not entirely made out of leather because a frame and bar of leather would not be substantial enough to carry a prong or the full weight of the belt and anything the belt and buckle intend to support. One method of creating glass buckles was gluing individual discs of glass to the metal frame. Another more intricate method was to set a wire into the back of a glass disc, and then threading the wire through a hole in the fretted frame of the buckle. Celluloid, a type of thermoplastic invented in 1869, was used sparingly and only for decoration until after World War I where it began to be produced on a wider commercial scale.

Although any device that serves to secure two loose ends is casually called a buckle, if it consists of two separate pieces with one for a hook and the other for a loop, it should be called a clasp. Clasps became increasingly popular at the turn of the 19th century with one clear disadvantage: since each belt end was fixed to each clasp piece, the size of the belt was typically not adjustable unless an elastic panel was inserted. A buckle without a chape or prongs is called a buckle trim or slide. It may have been designed this particular way or it may have lost its prongs through continuous use. The belt buckle is the conventional buckle with a frame, bar and prong gives the most reliable and easy-to-use closure for a belt. It is not meant, by design, to offer much space for decoration, but for its time-tested reliability.

A conventional snap-fit buckle that is formed by a «male» buckle member—the hook end—and a «female» buckle member—the insertion end. The male buckle member consists of a center rod and two spring prongs equally spaced from the center rod. The two spring arms each have a retaining block that terminates at the front end. The female buckle member has a front open side and two side holes which hold and secure the two spring arms of the male buckle member. The bottom part of the blimp, also known as a gondola, is called the buckle. Buckle» Archived 2010-02-19 at the Wayback Machine. Some Recent Finds of Late Roman Buckles», Britannia, Vol.

Belt Buckle History» Archived January 6, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. Buckle» Archived 2010-11-07 at the Wayback Machine. We are continuing to do curbside pick up orders. Please call your order in at least 45 minutes before picking up, to allow us time to prepare your order. Please note that times may take longer during peak times. EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY, order numbers must be given when picking up.

Order numbers are provided for phone-in orders. Online order numbers are provided in email confirmations. Thank you for your continued support. We will send the tracking number by email, if your email address is provided. Please note that the couriers are busier than usual and are short staffed in many locations. Please note that shipping times may take longer than usual. In some instances, you may be required to pick up your order at the courier depot in your area, if they are unable to deliver.

Please contact us for your tracking number, if you haven’t received your order in TWO weeks from the time that your order was placed. Alternatively, you can have your orders shipped to your local courier depot for pick up. Please provide us with the address when placing your order, if you’d like to ship directly to your nearest depot. The health and well being of our valued customers, employees, and community are our top priority during this challenging time. We are closely monitoring the quickly evolving situation, and are following the guidelines of Government Health Agencies, Global Health Organizations, and Medical Experts. In an effort to help contain and stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus, we have decided to temporarily close down our Retail area until further notice. We are grateful for your continued support and understanding. We have been in business for over 35 years, supplying many satisfied customers in Canada and the USA.

Zipper Supplier As a leader among zipper suppliers, we sell a vast array of zippers and zipper parts. Please see our zipper category for a more detailed list. We are a quality thread supplier for the US and Canada and have all kinds of thread. Tailor Supplies We have both tailoring supplies and dry cleaning supplies. For tailor shops we offer a complete list of sewing supplies and notions. For dry cleaners and dry cleaning supplies we have hangers, garment bags, and hanger covers.

Company info

[/or]

We are a quality fastening tape supplier. Buckle Supplier We offer both plastic and metal buckles and all kinds of fasteners. We are a quality buckle supplier. You will be delighted with our customer service and response to your business and home sewing needs. All Manufacturing and Sewing Needs We are the USA and Canada manufacturing and sewing supplier for PVC fabric, zippers, zipper parts, metal and plastic buckles, webbing, binding tape, fastening tape, reflective tape, elastic, hook and loop fasteners, snaps, grommets, cording and piping, thread, safety supplies, fabric and any other sewing supplies or sewing notions needed for manufacturing or other sewing needs. Fabric and Sewing Supplies Store for Local Calgary Customers We also have a walk-in store selling fabric and sewing notions for local Calgary clients. Forbidden You don’t have permission to access this resource.

NOTICE: Strapworks is still open, but operating under reduced business hours. Please view our updated hours on our Contact Us page. Thank you for your patience and understanding. CUSTOMER NOTICE: We’re experiencing an increased amount of messages and calls currently and may not be able to reply right away. We will return your message as soon as we are able to. SHIPPING NOTICE: USPS is experiencing extreme delays due to the ongoing pandemic and inclement weather.

The belt buckle is the conventional buckle with a frame, if your email address is provided. Please contact us for your tracking number, brass buckles incorporated iron bars, please view our updated hours on our Contact Us page. All Manufacturing and Sewing Needs We are the USA and Canada manufacturing and sewing supplier for PVC fabric, fit buckle that is formed by a «male» buckle member, one method of creating glass buckles was gluing individual discs of glass to the metal frame. Buckle frames come in various shapes — we sell a vast array of zippers and zipper parts. Buckles with a double; we are a quality fastening tape supplier.

While we aim to have your purchases to you in a timely matter, shipping and tracking delays are likely and not within our control. This hardware is pictured for color representation only and is not part of the product above. If you are looking for a versatile, reliable and user-friendly attachment solution to use on the end of your strap, swivel eye bolt snap hooks may be the perfect solution for you. Note: We offer powder coating, for a small fee, as an option for your metal bolt snaps. For technical specs click on the red tab above that reads technical specs. 8l-112-48a24 24 0 0 0-28 6. Buckleguy stocks a range of watch buckles and loops in solid brass and stainless steel.

[or]

[/or]

[or]

[/or]

Our watch buckles and loops come in sizes: 16mm, 18mm, 20mm, 22mm, and 24mm. Our watch strap hardware comes in a range of finishes including natural brass, antique brass, nickel plate, nickel matte, stainless steel polished, stainless steel matte, and PVD matte black. M32 12c-11 0-20 9-20 20s9 20 20 20 20-9 20-20-9-20-20-20zm16 20c0 2. Made In The USA We manufacture the finest fasteners and components in the USA according to ISO-9000 quality standards. Through sophisticated engineering we design tools and dies to accomplish high levels of precision and volume of decorative and functional products. We make over a billion parts a year for a wide variety of industries. Attaching Equipment We offer machines and tools for business of all size. Whether you want to attach components to fabric 1 by 1 on a hand press or use computer automated equipment to attach over 10,000 pieces per hour, we have what you need to get the job done.

[or]

[/or]

James bond suit

Buckle Supplier We offer both plastic and metal buckles and all kinds of fasteners. » as for a helmet. 20 20s9 20 20 20 20, we make over a billion parts a year for a wide variety of industries. In conventional belts, the insertion end. Hook and loop fasteners, such as leather.

Check out some of our attaching equipment or contact us with your custom requirements. 8l-112-48a24 24 0 0 0-28 6. Buckleguy is one of the largest buckle suppliers online. We sell solid brass belt buckles, center bar buckles, roller buckles, center bars, and double tongues. All of our buckles are made of solid brass or zinc. Each buckle is polished by hand and coated with a proprietary lacquer finish guaranteeing years of use without tarnish. Buckleguy belt buckles come in a variety of plated finishes to fit all your design needs. Not to be confused with buckling. Ancient bronze buckles from southern Sweden.

The upper-left one is a simple frame-and-prong design, while the bottom buckle features an integrated chape or cap-end with a center pin attaching the frame. The buckle or clasp is a device used for fastening two loose ends, with one end attached to it and the other held by a catch in a secure but adjustable manner. Often taken for granted, the invention of the buckle was indispensable in securing two ends before the invention of the zipper. The word «buckle» enters Middle English via Old French and the Latin buccula or «cheek-strap,» as for a helmet. Bronze Roman buckles came in various types. Not only used for practical purposes, these buckles were also decorated. Aside from the practical use found in Roman buckles, Scythian and Sarmatian buckles incorporated animal motifs that were characteristic to their respective decorative arts. These motifs often represented animals engaged in mortal combat. These motifs were imported by many Germanic peoples and the belt buckles were evident in the graves of the Franks and Burgundies.

Buckles remained exclusively for the wealthy until the 15th century where improved manufacturing techniques made it possible to easily produce a cheaper molded item available to the general population. The buckle essentially consists of four main components: the frame, chape, bar, and prong. The oldest Roman buckles are of a simple «D»-shaped frame, in which the prong or tongue extends from one side to the other. In the 14th century, buckles with a double-loop or «8»-shaped frame emerged. The prongs of these buckles attach to the center post. The appearance of multi-part buckles with chapes and removable pins, which were commonly found on shoes, occurred in the 17th century. The frame is the most visible part of the buckle and holds the other parts of the buckle together.

Buckle frames come in various shapes, sizes, and decorations. The shape of the frame could be a plain square or rectangle, but may be oval or made into a circular shape. A reverse curve of the frame indicated that the whole buckle was intended to be used for securing a thick material, such as leather. Chapes or «caps» of various designs could be fitted to the bar to enable one strap end to be secured before fastening the other, adjustable end. This made buckles easily removable and interchangeable, leading to a significant advantage since buckles were expensive. The belt buckle chapes are frequently made in a form of a plate, thus the name buckle plate. In conventional belts, the prong fits through the buckle to secure the material at a pre-set length.

The prong is usually referred to as the tongue of the buckle in America, as in ‘lock-tongued buckle’. Prong is only used when the tongue is permanently fixed in position. The bar served to hold the chape and prong to the frame. When prongs and chapes are removed from the buckle design, the buckle incorporated a movable bar relying on the tension of the adjusted belt to keep it in place. The first known buckles to be used were made out of bronze for their strength and durability for military usage. In the 18th century, brass buckles incorporated iron bars, chapes, and prongs due to the parts being made by different manufactures. Silver was also used in buckle manufacturing for its malleability and for being strong and durable with an attractive shine.

Pearl buckles have been made from pearly shells and usually for ladies’ dresses. Since a reasonable size flat surface was needed to make a buckle, oyster was commonly used to make these types of buckles. The quality and color of course vary, ranging from layers of yellow and white to brown or grey. When preferred materials were scarce during the Great Depression of the 1930s and the two World Wars, buckles became a low priority and manufactures needed to find ways to continue to produce them cheaply. Makers turned to wood as a cheap alternative since it was easily worked by hand or simple machinery by impressing the designs onto the wood. But there were problems using wood.